I fall into the group of people skipping Google altogether and going straight to YouTube like you mentioned. Not only is video more engaging than reading text, I love the feature to speed up the video up to 2X the speed so that I can get through more info faster. In fact, I pass up on some videos on websites if there isn’t the ability to speed it up.
Watching and reading this blog for a while and must say that information here is impressive and really valuable. Just launched a couple new sites with guidance from here. Also, updating my older ones with tips and pieces of advice from this post. Giving the most attention for mobile optimization as I think it will dominate even more within next few years.
That's why it's necessary to always stay abreast of developments in the SEO world, so that you can see these algorithm updates coming or you can determine what to do once they’ve been released. The WordStream blog is a great resource for SEO updates, but we also recommend Search Engine Land and Search Engine Roundtable for news on updates. Glenn Gabe of G-Squared Interactive is also a great resource for analyzing the causes and impact of algorithm updates.
While Google never sells better ranking in our search results, several other search engines combine pay-per-click or pay-for-inclusion results with their regular web search results. Some SEOs will promise to rank you highly in search engines, but place you in the advertising section rather than in the search results. A few SEOs will even change their bid prices in real time to create the illusion that they "control" other search engines and can place themselves in the slot of their choice. This scam doesn't work with Google because our advertising is clearly labeled and separated from our search results, but be sure to ask any SEO you're considering which fees go toward permanent inclusion and which apply toward temporary advertising.
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.

You don’t want to “keyword stuff” and cram your core keyword and every possible variation of it into your alt attribute. In fact, if it doesn’t fit naturally into the description, don’t include your target keyword here at all. Just be sure not to skip the alt attribute, and try to give a thorough, accurate description of the image (imagine you’re describing it to someone who can’t see it – that’s what it’s there for!).


I’m not Brian, but I read this elsewhere recently. Publish your massive article and use it as cornerstone content. Write other articles that expand your sections from the cornerstone content. This helps you build great internal linking. This way you can focus your keyword as well. On top of your massive posts keyword, you can focus on more specific keywords on the expanded articles.
Hats off to your detailing and intelligence. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the post, very informative and engaging. I was actually applying them to see the amazing results. I also found a platform called soovledotcom which actually pulls keywords from amazon, e-bay, yahoo answer, wikipedia, google and bing, but your illustrations here will certainly yeild superior results for organic seo & finding keywords.
I've been using SE Ranking for tracking my progress in getting to the first page of Google for Qeryz for my target keywords. It's done a phenomenal job of keeping itself accurate - which sets it apart from all other rank tracking tools I've used in the past. That alone is reason enough for me to use and stay with SE Ranking amongst other things. Sean Si from Qeryz.com
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